Polini presents the new Scooter Team 4 exhaust system for Peugeot Kisbee 50

While that might not make sense to some, there is a vast world of performance-oriented aftermarket specifically for scooters. In Europe and Asia, it is not uncommon for small-displacement commuters to be modified to race on the circuit. This is especially true for older two-stroke models such as those from Vespa, Lambretta and Peugeot.

When it comes to aftermarket components dedicated to scooters, few manufacturers are as well known as Polini. The Italian manufacturer has a long history of producing all sorts of aftermarket components for Vespas, as well as other more traditional Japanese manufacturers. The company‘s products primarily consist of performance-oriented mods such as variator kits and exhaust systems. Its new offering is specific to the Peugeot Kisbee 50, a small zippy two-stroke scooter, and it’s a shiny new exhaust system in the form of the Polini Scooter Team 4.

The new muffler features a revised expansion chamber and an increased number of internal cones to maximize performance and give the scooter a more race-inspired look. In fact, Polini states that the pipe was developed from the Polini Italian Cup, so this exhaust system was truly born on the race track. It features a black anodized aluminum body with a removable end cap for use in the circuit. With the muffler fitted it is street legal and complies with emissions and noise regulations.

In addition to the exhaust system, Polini has also released the specific ECU to optimize the performance of the Scoter Team 4 exhaust on the Peugeot Kisbee. Programmed specifically for electronic fuel injection on the two-stroke engine, the ECU regulates and improves injection timing to deliver maximum gains through the smoother exhaust system. It equips the scooter with two predefined maps, which can easily be changed on the fly. It does, however, require you to connect the harness directly to the injector, so take note of that if you plan on installing it yourself.

Polini presents the new Scooter Team 4 exhaust system for Peugeot Kisbee 50

As for pricing and availability, the Polini Scooter Team 4 Exhaust System is available for 194 Euros plus tax and shipping, or approximately $209 USD. Meanwhile, the ECU, which Polini strongly recommends you install next to the exhaust system, sells for 108 Euros plus tax and shipping, which equates to roughly $116 USD. The exhaust and the ECU are 100% made in Italy. Note that prices may vary depending on where in the world you are from.

foodpanda adds electric scooter riders to its delivery team


After including members of the cycling community in its delivery service, foodpanda now welcomes electric scooter riders to its team.

In a press release, foodpanda said the inclusion of electric scooter riders will help the company continue to provide “fast and convenient food deliveries to its customers while providing members of the electric scooter community with a source. of income “.

foodpanda recently launched the electric scooter service with 25 riders in Makati and BGC. It will be a good opportunity for those who want to be the pioneers of the perfect service for safe, fast and efficient deliveries of 1 to 2 km.

According to foodpanda, there will be an onboarding process with a distribution of the company‘s free rider assets that includes a thermal bag, two sets of uniforms, a gcash card, a helmet and LED lights for successful applicants.

“With the growing community of electric scooter riders seeing it as a convenient way to get around, we are opening up this opportunity for them to have a source of income that will cover short-haul deliveries. We are testing this in our two metro areas and hope to be able to cover other areas soon. This is another way for foodpanda to innovate in its services to reach more customers, ”said foodpanda CEO Daniel Marogy. “To ensure road safety, which as one of our priorities, all approved scooters will meet the requirements of the city government. This is also in line with foodpanda’s initiatives to explore more sustainable efforts to reduce our carbon footprint. “


Scooter drivers prepare for epic trip from Eastwood to Orkney Islands to benefit veterans


Riders travel from Eastwood to the Orkney Islands and vice versa.

The group of seven friends, all of whom are members of the Sun Inn Scooter Club, plan to set off from Eastwood town center to the Orkney Islands in Scotland and return for an epic 14-day expedition.

Their journey will see them travel up the east coast and back down the west coast with nine stops along the way.

Dedicated runners hope to raise a total of £ 1,348 to match the number of kilometers covered on their trip.

Details of the scooter ride.

All funds raised will then be donated to the Eastwood branch of the Royal British Legion (RBL), which provides support to those who have served or are currently serving in the armed forces.

Scooter rider Kathryn Shrubb, who will be participating in the fundraising expedition, said, “Each year club members vote for the charity to raise funds for.

“The RBL was chosen in 2020, but due to pandemic restrictions we postponed it to 2021 because we couldn’t lift as much as we wanted last year.

“The charity holds its monthly meetings at the Sun Inn and we try to educate our veterans locally in the Eastwood District.

“Raising awareness of their well-being is particularly important. “

All runners will carry their luggage on board and pay for their own accommodation to ensure all money raised goes directly to the Royal British Legion.

“One of the hotel owners even gave us a discount, but we put the money right back into the fundraising pot,” added Kathryn.

The adventure promises to be unforgettable, with many additional surprises planned along the way.

Kathryn revealed, “While we are in Orkney, my husband and I have a Viking Fasting Blessing Ceremony.

“So we planned a lot for the trip.

“We will also have video cameras on our helmets so that we can capture some of the beautiful scenery. “

The runners will leave from the cenotaph of the town tomorrow (Saturday July 31) at 9 am.

Kathryn added, “If you have a scooter or a motorbike you can come and do part of the trip with us.

“Dave and Kathryn from Dog and Parrot also do a lot of work for our veterans and have given us a lot of support. Dave will also be joining us for the first leg of the trip.

“Our first stop will be Embleton NE66 3EX and we’re there for two nights. We will continue to post our itinerary and photos on our Facebook pages.

The group has raised £ 1,053 so far and is calling on the local community to help them reach their goal.

“Even a donation of £ 1 will help us reach our goal and help our veterans,” added Kathryn.

Runners are scheduled to return to Eastwood on August 14.


Should all cyclists and electric scooter riders wear i …


A petition has been launched on the UK government’s petitions page, calling for new requirements to be introduced for all electric scooter riders and cyclists who share our roads.

With personal mobility having seen incredible growth over the past year, many are turning to two wheels to get around.

While motorcycles and scooters, of course, go through some pretty rigorous testing and licensing (although CBT can be a bit lackluster for a brand new rider), jumping on an electric bike or scooter is completely free. . In particular, the rise of the rental of electric scooters and bicycles in cities.

Nicholas Frank Freeman thought that was enough and started this petition.

It was submitted with the following details:

“The government should require cyclists and e-scooter riders to display visible identification, require cycle lanes to be used when available, and introduce a licensing and penalty point system for all cyclists and a licensing system for electric scooter drivers.

The roads are now shared with more cyclists and electric scooters than ever before. Yet cyclists and electric scooter riders are currently not held accountable in the same way as drivers.

Bike paths can be safer but are often not used. A licensing system and a penalty point system should ensure responsible use of cycling and electric scooters.

If the petition reaches 10,000 signatures, the UK government will respond. With 100,000 signatures, it will be considered for debate in parliament. At the time of publication, it has 6,838 signatures.

Should electric scooter riders and cyclists be subject to new rules?

These aren’t exactly new ideas, we recently reported on Mr. Loophole having pretty much the same idea that everyone who shares the roads should be held accountable for their driving and wear visible identification (like a tabard).

A bicycle aptitude test doesn’t quite guarantee road safety, as taking it is entirely optional – I passed mine for the first time in school, I’m just saying. Although I’m pretty sure everyone did.

Do you think this is the right way to go? Let us know on social media.


Illegal North Shore Bike, Scooter Riders Challenge Police Policy


SALEM, MA – The apparent explosion of unregistered and unregistered bicycles and motorized scooters presents a frustrating and potentially dangerous challenge for North Shore police forces.

Salem Police said those driving the vehicles in an unsafe manner was a “continuing problem” on the north coast, but had worsened in recent days when they said a “well-organized group” biker had taunted police at stops in Beverly, Peabody, Salem and Lynn.

The challenge for police, they say, is that long-standing chase policies prevent them from engaging in a high-speed chase of a biker who refuses to stop.

Find out what’s happening in Salem with free real-time Patch updates.

“This is a particularly difficult problem for the police,” Salem police said in a statement over the weekend. “This policy is not lost on the operators of these vehicles who seem to be happy to take advantage of our reluctance to continue.”

Police said they heard residents believe that due to the policy, the police “ignore a clear violation of the law” and want to assure them that they are not ignoring the infractions and are taking action “to identify those who endanger our streets and apprehend them at a safer time. ”

Find out what’s happening in Salem with free real-time Patch updates.

Police said there were several groups of runners active at the end of last week, but one group particularly mocked police throughout the night in several towns on the North Shore.

Police say they were able to identify a motorcyclist and seize his bicycle, while another suffered injuries that would not endanger his life in an accident.

“It certainly illustrates how dangerous the practice is – both for the cyclist and the public,” Salem police said. “We will continue to respond to all reports of reckless driving and we will pursue other means of enforcement against leaking operators.”

Salem Police said illegal scooter operations should continue to be reported to 978-744-1212.

Anyone with information on organized groups of illegal runners is encouraged to call the Criminal Investigation Division at 978-745-9700 or the Anonymous Whistleblower Line at 978-619-5627.


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(Scott Souza is a Patch Field Editor covering Beverly, Danvers, Marblehead, Peabody, Salem and Swampscott. He can be reached at [email protected] Twitter: @Scott_Souza.)

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Electric scooter riders in Sheffield have warned they could face fines and penalty points


The Page Hall police team have clarified the rules for riding scooters in public following an increase in their popularity and complaints from local residents.

The law states that electric scooters can only be used on private land, with the owner’s permission.

They cannot drive on roads, sidewalks or any other public space without a valid driver’s license and insurance to do so.

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South Yorkshire Police have issued a reminder on laws surrounding the use of electric scooters

In a Facebook post, the Page Hall team said: “A topic of discussion that is popping up more and more among residents of the area is the legal framework around the electric scooter and its increasingly anti-social use.

“To clarify, as it stands, electric scooters are considered a motorized transporter and therefore meet the legal definition of a motor vehicle, similar to a Segway device or a scooter powered by a combustion engine. .

“This means that they can only be ridden on private land with the permission of the owner. They cannot be used on roads, sidewalks or other public spaces.

“To drive an electric scooter on a road, the driver must be in possession of a valid driver’s license and insurance to do so. Failure to comply with this obligation may result in the seizure of the electric scooter and the rider being fined and penalty points.

“Due to the safety concerns these scooters cause in the region, we will step up our efforts to enforce the law around them.”

Read more

Read more

Police search Sheffield for missing online pedophile


Electric scooter riders arrested on Brighton seafront by police


POLICE arrested electric scooter riders to let them know they are breaking the law.

Brighton and Hove Police officers arrested people outside Brighton Palace Pier yesterday morning.

Electric scooters can only be used on public roads if they are rented through government sponsored trials.

This takes place in 30 regions, including Newcastle, Bristol and Bournemouth, but not in Brighton and Hove.

If you own an electric scooter, you can only use it on private land. You are not allowed to use it on public roads, cycle paths or sidewalks.

A Sussex Police spokesperson said: ‘During a rain break this morning we were outside Palace Pier chatting with electric scooter riders to inform them that it is currently illegal to drive a electric scooter on a public road or sidewalk.

“There was some confusion around whether it was legal to rent an electric scooter under a government testing program. However, this is not the case in Brighton and Hove, so if you are driving an electric scooter, expect the police. ”

The police post on Facebook regarding their activity sparked debate about the future of electric scooters in the city.

One resident said: “I’m glad to see this, I can’t count the number of times I’ve been nearly run over by these electric scooters.

“With e-bikes, they have to be treated like motorcycles; the cyclist must undergo some sort of training such as a CBT (Compulsory Basic Training), carry out a technical check to confirm that he meets a safety standard and be taxed. ”

Another said: “They don’t pollute, just leave them alone and start doing something about all the motorists speeding up on their phones.”

Electric scooters are increasingly popular nationwide.

Argus:

Soaring sales of e-bikes and scooters have seen Halfords record a 72% increase in annual profits.

However, they remain illegal on the public highway unless they become part of a government lawsuit.

West Midlands Police have launched a month-long operation to tackle electric scooter riders breaking the law – violators face fines of £ 300.

Kent Police and Crime Commissioner urged ministers to suspend trials to ‘review the situation’

Matthew Scott said their use must be reconsidered before more people are injured and before trials are extended further.

He said: “Reckless drivers are becoming a threat on our roads and sidewalks, ignoring the law and endangering other road users.

“We urgently need decisive action now on their future, as we risk losing control of the matter and placing additional burdens on the police.

“Too many people are using them in places they shouldn’t and we need to prevent them from being bought for young people.”

He said there should be no more deployments until work is done with retailers, manufacturers and the public to keep it safe and people understand the law.


Eighteen electric scooter riders handed over warnings to the police: “stop driving illegally or face prosecution”


EIGHTEEN electric scooter riders have been given warnings during a Dorset Police Day of Action.

Launched in response to growing safety concerns about scooters, the initiative took place earlier this month.

These warnings are now at risk of being reported for traffic violations – the seizure of their electric scooter being a possibility – if they are again stopped driving illegally.

Electric scooters, two-wheeled scooters powered by an engine, have grown in popularity and divided public opinion equally in recent months.

Although the official Bournemouth and Poole trails, although the Beryl program, have been sanctioned by the government, it is illegal to operate a private electric scooter on public land. This includes roads, sidewalks, cycle paths, beach walks, bridle paths or any terrain accessible to the public such as parks and parking lots.

Sergeant Rhys Griffiths said, “Electric scooters have become a real problem for some local residents and complaints of misuse have increased in our communities.

“We are also seeing more people riding them as a result of the government trials taking place.

“However, it is still illegal to operate a private electric scooter on any public land, including sidewalks, roads and boardwalks.

“Drivers could commit an offense under the Road Traffic Act 1988 and, if used on the roadway, the Highway Act 1835.

“In short, unless you have hired the electric scooter through a government approved test program, you are not allowed to ride it on public land.”

  • Read more: Woman sued for driving electric scooter without driver’s license or insurance

The government has announced locations across the UK, including Bournemouth and Poole, where trials of electric scooter rental programs are taking place. This allows individuals to rent an electric scooter from an official program and to ride legally.

However, Dorset Police have stressed that private electric scooters are not part of this trial.

Phillip Ellis, CEO of Beryl, the company that runs the test program in Bournemouth and Poole, said: “The Beryl electric scooter program in Bournemouth and Poole provides the community with a green, convenient and enjoyable way to travel, clear alternative to travel by car.

“In government testing of electric scooters, they are classified as a type of motor vehicle and require a valid driver’s license, insurance, and for users to obey traffic laws.

“All users of our service must obey these laws and are reminded to them by safety reminders in our application as well as by our terms and conditions.

“In all cases where our vehicles are misused, Beryl reserves the right to ban those affected from our program and, if necessary, will take the matter to the police.

“We will continue to work with the board, the police and other stakeholders to support the safe and responsible use of our vehicles.”

Sgt Griffiths said officers will continue to approach electric scooters on public lands, take their contact details and explain where they can be ridden.

Police have also warned that anyone using private electric scooters on public land should stop doing so immediately or face prosecution for traffic violations and have your scooter seized.

David Sidwick, Dorset Police and Crime Commissioner, said: ‘The use of electric scooters has increased over the past few months and I know from talking to members of the public that many people are very concerned. by them, especially when riding along sidewalks and cycle paths.

“I am very happy to see Dorset Police taking proactive steps to tell drivers exactly where and how they are allowed to use their electric scooters.

“This advice is very clear and there should be no excuse for anyone to illegally ride one of these scooters anywhere in our county.

“I would also like to echo the warning given by officers that if someone persists in using their electric scooter on public land, the device could be seized and they could be prosecuted.”

The day of action took place on Thursday July 1st.


Cebu electric scooter group offers to help government


In this January 10, 2020 photo, Cebu City Councilor Joel Garganera rides an electric scooter during the Sinulog Festival 2020 launch parade.

CEBU CITY, Philippines – Djan Dyll Ardiente, primary care doctor and nurse, has trusted his electric scooter (e-scooter) for several months now.

Djan, who lives here on D. Jakosalem Street, decided to buy an electric scooter last March when the lockdown due to coronavirus disease was put in place and crippled public transport.

“I had planned to buy a motorcycle but with the confinement, getting a driver’s license would be too difficult. That’s why I bought an electric scooter, ”said Djan in a mix of Cebuano and English.

Since then, the 23-year-old nurse has been using his electric scooter for personal transportation and he said he was very happy to have made this decision.

“I usually spend around P200 a day to get to and from work when I take a cab. But now that I’m riding an electric scooter, it has helped me cut down on my daily expenses, ”Djan told CDN Digital in an interview.

He added that driving an electric scooter also cuts his commute time from an usual hour to around 10 to 15 minutes between his home and his workplace in IT Park, Barangay Apas.

“When you drive a four-wheeled vehicle like a taxi, you might get stuck in traffic, whereas in an electric scooter you may just find small roads and shortcuts that will get you to your job faster, and without bumping into you. in traffic, ”he explained.

The growing movement of electric scooters in Cebu

Electric scooters parked in front of a building in Gonzalez Compound, Brgy. Kamputhaw, Cebu City CDN Digital Photo | Morexette Marie Erram

CDN Digital met Djan at Gonzalez Compound at Barangay Kamputhaw on Saturday September 26, 2020.

At that time, he was with several other Cebuanos who, like him, own and drive electric scooters to take them anywhere in the Cebu metropolitan area.

Sugbo Skooteros

Recently, the Cebu City government has warned individuals like Djan who use electric scooters on public roads that their vehicles could be impounded and could be issued with tickets.

This is after Mayor Edgardo Labella and the Cebu City Transportation Bureau (CCTO) announced that they would tighten up a provision in the city’s highway code that allegedly prohibits electric scooters from driving on the streets.

Labella, in previous interviews, also said the move was aimed at preventing accidents involving scooters from occurring on Cebu City’s roads and major arteries.

READ MORE: Banning electric scooters from major arteries, city roads are for public safety – Labella

The move drew much criticism and reaction from the public, citing the need for alternative modes of transportation due to the “lack of public utility vehicles (VPUs)” amid an ongoing public health crisis.

Read: Cebu City father bans electric scooters: “It’s premature”

This prompted Sugbo Skooteros, a Cebu-based community that promotes electric scooters as an alternative and sustainable mode of transportation, to launch a plan to help cyclists like Djan.

Dr Evanuelle Mendoza, one of the founders of Sugbo Skooteros, said her group was willing to help the city government regulate electric scooters if that meant not restricting the use of this two-wheeled vehicle to transportation purposes.

The growing movement of electric scooters in Cebu

Dr Evanuelle Mendoza, founder of Sugbo Skooteros. Digital Photo CDN | Morexette Marie Erram

“We don’t use electric scooters for recreation. We use it as a means of transport which will help us to travel from point A to point B ”

“We met (the head of CCTO) and offered to help with regulation until there was a final draft (of guidelines on electric scooters) approved by the LTO (Land Transport Authority)” , Mendoza said.

The doctor was referring to the statement by Secretary of Transportation Arthur Tugade that the Department of Transportation (DOTr) did not want the mandatory registration of electric scooters and e-bikes (e-bikes) until the LTO issues a memorandum official or directives concerning the regulation of these vehicles.

Mendoza said that if local officials accept their offer, Sugbo Skooteros will provide consultation and technical assistance to ensure the city’s roads are safe and inclusive for electric scooter riders.

“We would like to work with the Cebu City government, and we hope they will accept our offer,” he said.

Sugbo Skooteros was established in 2019. According to Mendoza, it was an offshoot of growing interest nationwide in electric scooters as sustainable modes of transportation that could help reduce carbon footprints and the number of gasoline vehicles on the streets.

One of the main functions of Sugbo Skooteros was to inform, educate and train drivers on the correct way to ride electric scooters, as well as the relevant traffic rules and regulations.

“As a community, we watch each other once we ride our electric scooters on the roads. We all understood the traffic rules and the safety measures needed to cross the roads, ”Mendoza said.

Electric scooters and pandemic

When the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) hit the city of Cebu earlier this year and quarantine restrictions halted PUV operations, the membership of Sugbo Skooteros rapidly increased.

Mendoza said about 45% to 55% of people who joined their community were workers like Djan, battling the pandemic on the front lines.

“When they said they were going to ban electric scooters, they weren’t just reaching a small community,” Mendoza said.

“We are ready for regulation with the appropriate consultation. What we are opposed to is prohibiting someone from moving and crossing the road. This is why we want to work with the government and make the public understand why it is a sustainable mode of transport, ”he added.

The group takes issue with city government claims that City Ordinance 801 or Cebu City Traffic Code prohibited roller coasters, roller skates and toy vehicles or similar devices on any road, except when crossing a street.

But Mendoza, citing the initial findings of Sugbo Skooteros’ own legal team, said electric scooters did not fall into the prohibited category by Cebu City’s traffic laws.

“We don’t use electric scooters for recreation. We use it as a means of transportation that will help us travel from point A to point B, ”he explained.

In the meantime, Mendoza said his group is helping its members know what to do in case a traffic cop in Cebu City reports them for riding their electric scooters.

“Many of our members have asked us for clarification. Our legal team helps them know what to expect and what to do when an enforcement official tells them to stop, ”Mendoza said.

For Djan, the city government’s statement was “not right at the moment and inappropriate.” But that won’t stop him, and Sugbo Skooteros for that matter, from riding their electric scooters to promote their advocacy and invite more people to join their community.

The growing movement of electric scooters in Cebu

Nurse and Sugbo Skootero Member Djan Dyll Ardiente CDN Digital Photo | Morexette Marie Erram

“It’s not right now and inopportune given that people like me needed an affordable way to get from point A to point B when there was a pandemic going on. But I know what to say in case the authorities ask me why I am driving an electric scooter. For me, the key is to continue to be a law-abiding cyclist who obeys the proper traffic rules and regulations, ”said Djan.

/ bmjo

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Scooter convoy marks funeral for Sherwood’s popular father and Mod


A convoy of scooter riders celebrated the funeral of a popular father, grandfather and Mod Sherwood in Quadrophenia style.

The grandfather of five, Danny Pugh, died on December 13 at the age of 58 after battling heart disease for seven years.

He worked as a porter before becoming a DJ.

Mr. Pugh owned two scooters and was passionate about Northern Soul and Motown classics, as well as Mod The Who staples.

To honor her father, her 32-year-old daughter Dee Bonsoir rallied around for people with Mod-style scooters to come forward and help lead the funeral procession.

After posting a pre-funeral appeal on Facebook, she was amazed at the reaction from Mods across the country as around 30 riders showed up on Vespas and Lambrettas to provide the colorful procession as friends and family said moving farewells.

The funeral took place on Monday January 6 and scooters escorted Mr Pugh’s casket from his home in Sheridan Way to the Wilford Hill Crematorium.

Ms Bonsoir, a community caregiver from Brinsley, said: “I had so many answers to the call, it was amazing.

“To have this farewell is unreal, he would love it, (it) means so much to us.

“Dad grew up loving mods. He always owned a scooter and rode with scooter clubs. He loved records from the 60s and 70s, Northern Soul and Motown.

“He had a few parkas, fox tails for his scooters and he had a room dedicated to the 60s and 70s.

“He loved The Who and Quadrophenia.

“Before his heart disease got worse, he was pretty straightforward, with a great sense of humor – sometimes inappropriate.



Danny Pugh, a former doorman, DJ and Mod fan.

“Dad was a porter for many years at various locations in Nottingham and Arnold, then DJ at the Carrington Inn.”

She added, “Seven years ago she was diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy.

“He went from a bubbly, lovable, party-loving person to a shadow of himself.

“He would be bedridden for days at a time. He became short of breath. He lost his sense of humor. He was quite depressed.



Danny Pugh's funeral was held at Wilford Hill Cemetery.
Danny Pugh’s funeral was held at Wilford Hill Cemetery.

“He wasn’t able to be as active as before. He sold his DJ stuff.

“For the past five months he was texting us to tell us how much he loved us. He certainly knew what was going on.



Danny Pugh's funeral was held at Wilford Hill Cemetery.
Danny Pugh’s funeral was held at Wilford Hill Cemetery.

“I feel like he hung on until I found someone decent. I’m with a really nice guy now.

“I felt like as soon as Dad found out I was taken care of he was able to leave.”

Mr Pugh was the father of Dee and brother Ben Bonsoir, 31, as well as younger sons Jack, 11, and Jake, four, whom he had with his partner, 18, Rachel Coupland.

He also has five grandchildren aged 15, seven, three, two and one.

Mr Pugh’s heart stopped on December 8 and, although he was resuscitated by paramedics, he was placed in a induced coma at Nottingham City Hospital in the intensive care unit.

On December 13, his family was told that he was showing no response and was suffering from multiple organ failure, so the decision was made to “let him go.”


World Record Scooter Team Comes Home For Lansdale Mardi Gras Parade | New


LANSDALE >> If you’re coming to the 69th Annual Lansdale Mardi Gras Parade this Saturday, keep your eyes peeled to see two men wearing bright blue sweatshirts with the words ‘World Record’ on the front and riding motorized scooters on the parade route. They will celebrate their return to the borough almost three months after embarking on an adventure across the country of more than 9,000 miles that will earn them a place in the Guinness Book of Records.

At 7:45 p.m. Tuesday night, Yonatan Belik, 30, of Israel, and Michael Reid, 32, of south Philadelphia, officially completed their attempt to break the world record for the longest ride on a 50cc scooter by pulling their Honda. Ruckus scooters in the parking lot of the town hall. They were greeted in town by Mayor Garry Herbert and Police Chief Michael Trail, who officially witnessed the end of the duo’s round trip across America known as “Project Create.” 48 ”. Their effort shattered the previous record of 8,968 miles.

The decision to ride scooters, given their top speed of around 35 mph, was intentional, according to the team‘s website. “We recognize how our busy lives cause us to focus on the destination rather than the journey, so we choose to take it slow. Invest time to immerse ourselves in our surroundings and avoid any chance of getting a speeding ticket while driving at 30 mph.

The two set a similar record for the longest distance scooted in 24 hours last summer. Both were produced under the direction of “Wheeling for the World”, a global association of members who seek to collaborate across cultures and countries.

‘Chlichout’

The duo were delighted to be back in Lansdale and said the unique experience was both uplifting and inspiring. The purpose of the trip was to bond community by meeting new people and learning their stories. For Reid, the trip helped him learn to trust the kindness of complete strangers.

“I grew up in a tough neighborhood and often have a strong distrust of strangers,” he said. “People I don’t know don’t have my best interests in mind. This is what I firmly believed before that.

He told the story of driving one evening in the freezing cold of New Mexico and at risk of developing hypothermia from the exposure. “Belik had the idea of ​​knocking on a stranger’s door in the New Mexico countryside. Being from the United States, I knew you don’t do this. You get shot doing that, ”Reid said. Belik did it anyway and graciously the owner invited them inside. “It was a great time… when it came to actually, they were very friendly.”

The trip challenged Reid’s preconceptions about compassion for strangers and helped him learn to befriend every new person he meets.

Belik, meanwhile, has learned to overcome the physical demands of travel. “One thing that comes to my mind is how difficult it was,” he said. “We’re talking six to 10 hours a day sitting on our butt… on unfamiliar terrain, in weather conditions I’ve never experienced in my life. I grew up in Israel. it’s hot. Here it is not only snowing, it is actually freezing. Your fingers are numb.

The trip was also an opportunity for Belik and Reid to inspire others. Along the way, they documented their travels online through photos and videos and by interviewing more than 200 people they met in each state. They hoped to share America’s untold stories. Belik called the journey a “shlichut,” which is a Hebrew word meaning a mission or an inner call. Everywhere they went, they met new people and learned their personal stories. He hoped that their attempt to break the world record would inspire people to pursue their own personal dreams, no matter how far-fetched they were. “Everyone has dreams and everyone has aspirations,” he said. “And some people don’t necessarily believe they can reach them… We were on a mission and everyone has a mission.”

Happy to see you again

The trip began on September 7, when the duo set off during Lansdale Bike Night, sponsored by the Blue Comet Motorcycle Club in Skippack. Gene Reynolds, president of Lansdale Bike Night, said the two travelers contacted him to start their trip at the family event and it looked perfect.

“We escorted them out of town with one of our members who took a picture of them leaving town and we were able to follow them online to find out where they were,” he said. he declares. “They contacted me several times. They contacted me once and they were in the snow in New Mexico. They’re two crazy guys… it’s been a great experience.

“It’s a good thing for our club because we are so diverse,” said Russell Smith, president of the Blue Comet Motorcycle Club. “Most motorcycle clubs have a bad reputation and we do a lot of charitable work, veteran work. We are a family biker club. We’ve been around forever and we have a lot of respect there.

State Representative Steve Malagari, D-53rd Dist., Who helped evict Reid and Belik in September but was unable to make it to their meeting on Tuesday, praised their accomplishment. “Their goal of connecting communities and cultures through conversation is a cause that speaks volumes and is at the heart of what our district is also striving to do,” he said. “A better understanding of our communities and our world through dialogue is something we should all aspire to have. I’m proud that this world record started and ended in Lansdale, PA and the 53rd District.

Meanwhile, Herbert was delighted to welcome the two travelers to town on Tuesday evening, having been there to see them leave almost three months previously. “I am extremely proud that Lansdale is featured in the Guinness Book of Records. It’s a monumental occasion, ”said Herbert, who embraced Belik and Reid on their return. “It’s not everyday that you welcome the start and end of a trip like this. This is a testament to the quality of the Lansdale community.

Herbert said he was proud of Reid and Belik’s accomplishment, as well as their message about slowing down and enjoying the world around you. “It’s really positive,” Herbert said. “We are constantly changing and moving forward. There is value in slowing down and enjoying the world around you. It resonates with the residents of Lansdale because of who we are and everything that is happening in our community. “

Good road

With their accomplishment now headed to the record books, Reid and Belik said they are already making plans for their next adventure. The two travel to Iceland to break the world record for the longest distance in an electric unicycle while juggling three balls.

“I know that sounds absurd, and it’s a little absurd,” Belik said. “What we’re trying to do here is use the notoriety of Guinness World Records to draw attention to important things. The guy we’re going to do this with, he’s got a disease similar to (multiple sclerosis). He’s an amazing performer and juggler, but he knows he’s going to lose his ability to perform and be physically active in the years to come. We want to draw attention to this. Not just for people in his place to push each other, but for people like us who have skills that don’t necessarily push themselves to these extremes.

After Iceland, the pair will travel to Israel in June to begin a 600-mile journey on electric unicycles from the country’s northern tip to the southern tip and back again. The aim will be to amplify the stories of the people of the country and to humanize them for the world to see. “We want to close these gaps which are getting wider and wider,” Belik said.

To learn more about Reid and Belik’s record-breaking adventure, visit https://projectcreate48.wheelingfortheworld.org/

The 69th Annual Lansdale Mardi Gras Parade begins Saturday, November 23 at 1 p.m. The rain or shine event features community organizations, local groups and ends with a visit from Santa. The parade stretches from Main and Mitchell Streets to Main and Park Street. For more information visit http://lansdale.org/400/Mardi-Gras-Parade

Editor-in-chief Dan Sokil contributed to this report.


World record scooter team heads home for Lansdale Mardi Gras parade – thereporteronline


LANSDALE >> If you come to the 69th Annual Lansdale Mardi Gras Parade this Saturday, keep your eyes peeled to see two men wearing bright blue sweatshirts with the words ‘World Record’ on the front and riding motorized scooters down the course of the parade. They will celebrate their return to the borough almost three months after embarking on an adventure across the country of more than 9,000 miles that will earn them a place in the Guinness Book of Records.

At 7:45 p.m. Tuesday night, Yonatan Belik, 30, of Israel, and Michael Reid, 32, of south Philadelphia, officially completed their attempt to break the world record for the longest ride on a 50cc scooter by pulling their Honda. Ruckus scooters in the parking lot of the town hall. They were greeted in town by Mayor Garry Herbert and Police Chief Michael Trail, who officially witnessed the end of the duo’s round trip across America known as “Project Create.” 48 ”. Their effort shattered the previous record of 8,968 miles.

The decision to ride scooters, given their top speed of around 35 mph, was intentional, according to the team‘s website. “We recognize how our busy lives cause us to focus on the destination rather than the journey, so we choose to take it slow. Invest time to immerse ourselves in our surroundings and avoid any chance of getting a speeding ticket while driving at 30 mph.

The two set a similar record for the longest distance scooted in 24 hours last summer. Both were produced under the direction of “Wheeling for the World”, a global association of members who seek to collaborate across cultures and countries.

‘Chlichout’

The duo were delighted to be back in Lansdale and said the unique experience was both uplifting and inspiring. The purpose of the trip was to bond community by meeting new people and learning their stories. For Reid, the trip helped him learn to trust the kindness of complete strangers.

“I grew up in a tough neighborhood and often have a strong distrust of strangers,” he said. “People I don’t know don’t have my best interests in mind. This is what I firmly believed before that.

He told the story of driving one evening in the freezing cold of New Mexico and at risk of developing hypothermia from the exposure. “Belik had the idea of ​​knocking on a stranger’s door in the New Mexico countryside. Being from the United States, I knew you don’t do this. You get shot doing that, ”Reid said. Belik did it anyway and graciously the owner invited them inside. “It was a great time… when it came to actually, they were very friendly.”

The trip challenged Reid’s preconceptions about compassion for strangers and helped him learn to befriend every new person he meets.

Belik, meanwhile, has learned to overcome the physical demands of travel. “One thing that comes to my mind is how difficult it was,” he said. “We talk six to ten hours a day sitting on our buttocks… on unfamiliar terrain, in weather conditions I’ve never experienced in my life. I grew up in Israel. it’s hot. Here it is not only snowing, it is actually freezing. Your fingers are numb.

The trip was also an opportunity for Belik and Reid to inspire others. Along the way, they documented their travels online through photos and videos and by interviewing more than 200 people they met in each state. They hoped to share America’s untold stories. Belik called the journey a “shlichut,” which is a Hebrew word meaning a mission or an inner call. Everywhere they went, they met new people and learned their personal stories. He hoped that their attempt to break the world record would inspire people to pursue their own personal dreams, no matter how far-fetched they were. “Everyone has dreams and everyone has aspirations,” he said. “And some people don’t necessarily believe they can reach them… We were on a mission and everyone has a mission.”

Happy to see you again

The trip began on September 7, when the duo set off during Lansdale Bike Night, sponsored by the Blue Comet Motorcycle Club in Skippack. Gene Reynolds, president of Lansdale Bike Night, said the two travelers contacted him to start their trip at the family event and it looked perfect.

“We escorted them out of town with one of our members who took a picture of them leaving town and we were able to follow them online to find out where they were,” he said. he declares. “They contacted me several times. They contacted me once and they were in the snow in New Mexico. They’re two crazy guys… it’s been a great experience.

“It’s a good thing for our club because we are so diverse,” said Russell Smith, president of the Blue Comet Motorcycle Club. “Most motorcycle clubs have a bad reputation and we do a lot of charitable work, veteran work. We are a family biker club. We’ve been around forever and we have a lot of respect there.

State Representative Steve Malagari, D-53rd Dist., Who helped evict Reid and Belik in September but was unable to make it to their meeting on Tuesday, praised their accomplishment. “Their goal of connecting communities and cultures through conversation is a cause that speaks volumes and is also at the heart of what our district strives to achieve,” he said. “A better understanding of our communities and our world through dialogue is something we should all aspire to have. I’m proud that this world record started and ended in Lansdale, PA and the 53rd District.

Meanwhile, Herbert was delighted to welcome the two travelers to town on Tuesday evening, having been there to see them leave almost three months previously. “I am extremely proud that Lansdale is featured in the Guinness Book of Records. It’s a monumental occasion, ”said Herbert, who embraced Belik and Reid on their return. “It’s not everyday that you welcome the start and end of a trip like this. This is a testament to the quality of the Lansdale community.

Herbert said he was proud of Reid and Belik’s accomplishment, as well as their message about slowing down and enjoying the world around you. “It’s really positive,” Herbert said. “We are constantly changing and moving forward. There is value in slowing down and enjoying the world around you. It resonates with the residents of Lansdale because of who we are and everything that is happening in our community.

Good road

With their accomplishment now headed to the record books, Reid and Belik said they are already making plans for their next adventure. The two travel to Iceland to break the world record for the longest distance in an electric unicycle while juggling three balls.

“I know that sounds absurd, and it’s a little absurd,” Belik said. “What we’re trying to do here is use the notoriety of Guinness World Records to draw attention to important things. The guy we’re going to do this with, he’s got a disease similar to (multiple sclerosis). He’s an amazing performer and juggler, but he knows he’s going to lose his ability to perform and be physically active in the years to come. We want to draw attention to this. Not just for people in his place to push each other, but for people like us who have skills that don’t necessarily push themselves to these extremes.

After Iceland, the pair will travel to Israel in June to begin a 600-mile journey on electric unicycles from the country’s northern tip to the southern tip and back. The aim will be to amplify the stories of the people of the country and to humanize them for the world to see. “We want to close these growing gaps,” Belik said.

To learn more about Reid and Belik’s record-breaking adventure, visit https://projectcreate48.wheelingfortheworld.org/

The 69th Annual Lansdale Mardi Gras Parade begins Saturday, November 23 at 1 p.m. The rain or shine event features community organizations, local groups and ends with a visit from Santa. The parade stretches from Main and Mitchell Streets to Main and Park Street. For more information visit http://lansdale.org/400/Mardi-Gras-Parade

Editor-in-chief Dan Sokil contributed to this report.


Lime brings the Group Ride Electric Scooter Option to the US so you stop tandem riding


Lime is offering a new feature for its electric scooter rentals in the United States and Canada. Group Ride, which Lime announced today plans to roll out to North America soon, seeks to ensure that every rider in a group has their own scooter.

Group Ride, Lime’s next addition to the US and Canadian version of its app, is designed to make it easier for groups to ride together on shared electric scooters.

The electric scooters, which Lime offers to rent for around $ 1 to start and 15 cents a minute, were previously a one-rider business.

If you and a friend both wanted to get to your destination, you each had to have a Lime account and unlock your own electric scooter. Or as it often happened in practice, one person would unlock an electric scooter, and then the two users would ride together in tandem. It was a violation of Lime’s rules – but that didn’t stop it from happening.

Group Ride could make electric scooters safer and easier to use

With Group ride, a single Lime user can unlock up to five scooters at a time. The feature is designed to allow one person to pay for (and be responsible for) all scooters unlocked with Group Ride.

According to Lime:

Over the next few weeks, Lime riders in select cities across the United States and Canada will be able to access the Group Ride app directly from their iOS and Android devices. It is important to note that all participants must always agree to abide by Lime’s rules and regulations before riding.

While Lime tries to keep two cyclists away from a single scooter, another electric scooter startup is trying to do the opposite. Tango hopes to provide a Lime-type electric scooter sharing service, but with the addition of longer electric scooters designed to carry two riders. Tandem scooters, which look like an electric scooter limousine, have a second handlebar for the rear driver.

Taking Electek

Group Ride actually seems to be a very useful tool, in my opinion.

I’m sure it will be useful for keeping a cyclist per scooter, but I think it will also be great for families and tourists who are trying to get around a city together.

Electrek’s own publisher, Seth Weintraub, recently discovered it the hard way while traveling with his family in Europe. Between his wife, kids, and himself, they roamed the city on a mishmash of limes, birds, and jumps so they could unlock enough shared vehicles for everyone to use at the same time. But a single account unlocking up to five scooters would be perfect for this kind of situation.

I’m in favor of anything that makes these fun and efficient electric scooters a safer option for commuting around town.

FTC: We use automatic affiliate links which generate income. Following.


These scooter riders are happy to stay in the slow lane


For some, there is no better feeling than hitting the road on two wheels.

Hollywood captured him in the movie Easy Rider, actor Ewan McGregor captured him with his friend and motorcyclist fanatic Charley Boorman on epic rides across the continent for their television series Long Way Round and Low Way Down.

The Hobart Motor Scooter Club, however, operates on a much more relaxed schedule.

On a Sunday morning, once a month, club members meet in Salamanca Square for a quiet coffee and chat before heading to a destination outside of Hobart.

Sharon Heritage is the founding member and president of the club.

“It started in 2002 when I had my L’s and wanted other people to be able to ride with them,” she said.

“I just put an ad in the local newspaper to see what interest there was, and there was enough to start something.”

There are now 30 members in good standing.

A group of Vespas belonging to the Hobart Motor Scooter Club.(

ABC News: Michael Dalla Fontana

)

Sharon’s admiration for all things scooters stems from her interest in 1960s Mod era music.

She owns six predominantly vintage Vespa scooters: a Vespa Super, a 1965 50S, a 1967 Super Sprint 90, a 1973 Vespa Primavera 125 and a 1968 Super Sport 180.

She describes her 2002 PX-200 as her most “comfortable” scooter and the one she uses the most. She traveled approximately 116,000 kilometers.

This is the scooter she borrows for national scooter rallies.

With Hobart’s clubbing, it’s like a roll of the dice when it comes to deciding where to go.

“I have a shopping list that we have done in the past and I alternate them every year with new ones every now and then,” she said.

Some rides are night business.

Vespas lined up in a Hobart lane
The club always loads up on caffeine before a race.(

ABC News: Michael Dalla Fontana

)

“Places like Bicheno or Tarraleah. Our day walks are usually no further than towns like Orford or Geeveston,” she said.

At 86, former London Metropolitan and Tasmanian Police Officer David Sowerby is the club’s oldest member.

The man from Midway Point who immigrated to Australia with his wife and family in 1966 has been cycling for 70 years. He joined the club four years ago.

“I love the camaraderie, the common interest and the exhilaration of two-wheeled transport,” he said.

“In the 90s, as a member of the Ulysses Club, I made the round trip to Toowoomba in Queensland,” said David.

Originally from Launceston, Pam Genders, 71, has lived in Hobart since the early 1980s.

David Sowerby, oldest member of the Hobart Motor Scooter Club
At 86, David Sowerby is the club’s oldest member.(

ABC News: Michael Dalla Fontana

)

She got her motorcycle license in her early twenties while driving – as she puts it – her little Honda, around Launceston.

“It was around the time when the police were just saying to go around the block,” she said.

“And when I got home he said, ‘Well, you can get your license now’.”

After a long hiatus, Pam only returned to two wheels at the age of 67, when she joined the Hobart Motor Scooter Club.

“People are wonderful, they can’t do enough to help you, it’s just a wonderful place to get involved,” she said.

A vintage Vespa scooter
Vespas have recently seen a resurgence in popularity.(

ABC News: Michael Dalla Fontana

)

Last year Pam drove a Vespa from Paris to Belfast for a big scooter rally.

“I picked up a scooter in Paris and rode all over Britain all the way to Ireland, an absolutely fantastic rally. I made fantastic friends all over the world thanks to the scooter group,” she said. .

Last year she also joined three club members on a scooter rally in Canberra.

“We did 4000 kilometers in 10 days. It was pretty good,” she said.

She said the Vespa was a bit heavy for her, so she went for an Aprilia Scarabeo 125cc which had large wheels.

She now rides on a Scarabeo 200cc.

Wheel of a scooter
The club has been in existence for 17 years.(

ABC News: Brian Tegg

)

And what about the regular grunts of rush hour traffic in Hobart?

Club president Sharon Heritage believes more scooters and motorcycles on the road is the answer.

“Channel filtering [driving between two lanes of traffic] has been an important development, even if some motorists do not seem to be aware that it is now legal, ”she laments.

But she admits that getting a motorcycle license is much more complex and expensive these days.

Michael Dalla Fontana on his Vespa
Journalist Michael Dalla Fontana recently joined the club and took his vintage Vespa scooter on a 40 kilometer race.(

ABC News

)


Voi electric scooter group gathers supporters for the battle of the rides


Voi Updates

A series of leading venture capital groups, entrepreneurs and businessmen have backed Swedish electric scooter start-up Voi as a European rival to American leaders Bird and Lime, recently launched on the continent. .

The $ 50 million round of funding led by venture capitalist Balderton Capital is the third round of ‘Series A’ funding by a European start-up in the past year, according to data from Pitchbook . It comes amid a wave of launches, funding and international expansion plans of electric scooter start-ups.

Raine Ventures, a branch of investment bank Raine Group, London-based venture capital firm LocalGlobe and hedge fund Luxor Capital participated in the round, along with entrepreneurs Nicolas Brusson, co-founder of BlaBlaCar, Sebastian Knutsson, co -founder of King and Justin Mateen, co-founder of Tinder.

The investment comes three months after Voi launched its first scooters in the Swedish capital Stockholm and, according to co-founder Fredrik Hjelm, the money will be used to expand in four to five countries by the end of the year. year. Voi scooters cost € 1 to unlock and 15 cents per minute to ride in Spain, the same price as Bird’s.

Douglas Stark, a second co-founder, told the Financial Times that Voi would have an advantage over Bird and Lime because it would focus on Europe, where the rules vary widely by city and country.

“If there were no barriers, no blockages, there would be no opportunity for the bigger American players,” he said. “But it is we who are going to be patient to enter into these [European] markets. “

Bird and Lime have together raised nearly $ 1 billion over the past year to fund their overseas expansion. The two electric scooter companies, which each operate in more than 100 cities around the world, began operating outside of North America this summer, starting with Paris. Both companies also have scooters on the streets of Madrid, Vienna and Zurich.

Voi’s rise comes as investors scramble to position themselves in the increasingly competitive market for electric scooters. This summer, Uber invested in Lime, which also counts Google Ventures among its backers, while Silicon Valley investors including Sequoia and Accel are investors in Bird.

The flood of interest has sparked a host of rival launches outside of the United States. Mexican firm Grin has raised $ 45 million and Brazilian firm Yellow $ 63 million in recent months, while several others are seeking funds in Europe, Latin America and Asia, according to investors. Estonia-based ridesharing company Taxify has started its own scooter subsidiary, called Bolt, in Paris.

Lars Fjeldsoe-Nielsen, general partner at Balderton, said he chose Voi because of its rate of revenue growth. “We believe that a major European player can emerge in this market,” he said. “Since I came back [from Silicon Valley to London], I haven’t seen any business grow as fast as this business has grown.

Voi declined to reveal his revenue figures, but said he reached 200,000 rides in two months.


Nostalgia: jazz-loving restaurateur and well-dressed scooter drivers


OWNER, manager, cook and extraordinary cabaret performer, Jean Jacques Jordan was an icon of the Kemp Town food scene for four decades.

Laughing Onion restaurant will be remembered by many, perhaps not for its food – which was still 70s French cuisine (think Provencal chicken, cassoulet, and snails) – but for its atmosphere.

A man named Harry would sit at the piano and play a selection of jazz lounge classics, while Mr. Jordan made his music in the kitchen, preparing dishes for guests until the final dessert was served, at which time. he himself would take center stage. .

Located at 80 St George’s Road, the restaurant served entertainment with entrees for 30 years, from 1976 until it closed in 2006.

The walls of Laughing Onion were adorned with images very similar to ours today, showing Mr. Jordan in various places during his career as a performer.

He met many celebrities during his life, including American jazz singer and conductor Cab Calloway and jazz legend Sidney Bechet. He even went on stage at the Moulin Rouge.

Do you remember having visited the restaurant? What more can you tell us, Mr. Jordan?

Brighton has long been home to the Mod movement, with people from all over the world coming to town for the annual Brighton Mod Weekenders.

Today we have two photographs that show how popular scooters were in the 60s.

Lambretta and Vespa scooters are still very much in fashion, with incredibly sought after retro models.

Have you ever owned one?

Our footage shows Hove and Portslade road safety organizer Normal Trow and RAC Superintendent J Tobin with young scooter riders.

Do you recognize any of the people depicted?

Our last image shows young pilots performing their scooter test in Brighton in 1964.

Were you one of them?


Crackdown on L-plate scooter riders with new CBT test


The government intends to make it more difficult to drive mopeds and scooters aged 16 and over by introducing a new theory of testing.

The Compulsory Basic Training (CBT) system has been in place – and unchanged – since 1990 and only requires a new pilot to show that he can master simple skills – without having to take any tests – before being cleared to take the road.

But Road Safety Minister Jesse Norman said on Tuesday that had to change with the introduction of a theory test and stricter penalties for those who accumulate penalty points by driving with L-plates attached to their vehicles. mopeds.

CBT changes on foot: if you are 16, you can ride a moped on L-plates after completing compulsory basic training which does not include any testing. However, that is expected to change next year with a theory test offered so new riders are allowed on the road.

16-year-old motorcyclists who have completed their TCC can ride a moped while displaying L-plates, while anyone 17 years of age or older can legally drive a machine up to 125cc with a maximum power of 15 horsepower, but again must show learning plates.

Any rider who does not pass their full motorcycle exam within 48 months must retake the CBT, although motorists who passed their driving exam before February 1, 2001 ride up to 50cc without having to take the training session.

For the past 27 years, there has been no testing requirement under this basic requirement to gain road access, meaning less experienced riders can be let go on some of the more popular routes. busiest in the country without having to display a full knowledge of the rules of the road.

However, Mr Norman wants this to change as part of a motorcycle training overhaul.

Following a public consultation including motorcyclists, new rules are expected to be introduced towards the end of next year which will impose a theoretical testing system under the CBT.

And to ensure that offending riders are not allowed to continue breaking the rules, provisional license holders will be banned from driving and will have to undergo additional training if they accumulate 6 penalty points.

The changes are part of the government’s desperate plans to reduce the number of road fatalities in the UK after statistics showed a 4% increase last year.

Of the 1,792 deaths, 319 were motorcyclists – more than a third of which were between 16 and 24 years old.

A consultation conducted by DfT and DVSA found that there was substantial support for improvements in CBT and those delivering the training courses

A consultation conducted by DfT and DVSA found that there was substantial support for improvements in CBT and those delivering the training courses

Although the overall death toll is at its highest level in five years with an increase in deaths from cars, pedestrians, cyclists and others, the number of motorcyclists killed fell 13% year-on-year.

That said, the Driving and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) contained 5,553 reports of seriously injured motorcyclists last year, one in six being mopeds or scooters.

In a statement this week, Norman said: “We have one of the best road safety records in the world, but we are determined to do more to prevent fatalities and serious injuries.

“Motorcyclists are among the most vulnerable road users and have the highest fatality rate of any group. This is why I am pleased to announce these changes to motorcycle training.

“These improvements should equip learners with a wider range of experiences and better driving skills, helping to make our roads safer for everyone.”

Motorcyclist fatalities on the road fell 13% in 2016, but a third of those killed were young riders aged 16 to 24.

Motorcyclist fatalities on the road fell 13% in 2016, but a third of those killed were young riders aged 16 to 24.

A survey of 2,200 respondents found tremendous support for riders to learn more about protective clothing and riding skills as part of mandatory basic training

A survey of 2,200 respondents found tremendous support for riders to learn more about protective clothing and riding skills as part of mandatory basic training

Mark Winn, Head of Cycling and Professional Policy at DVSA, added: “Our priority is to help cyclists go through a lifetime of safe riding.

“In 2016, more than a third of moped and motorcycle victims were between 16 and 24 years old.

“We want to reduce the risk they face by introducing more realistic and personalized training, delivered by better qualified instructors.

“Making these training improvements will help ensure that motorcyclists have the skills and knowledge they need to help them stay safe on our modern and busy roads. “

Road Safety Minister Jesse Norman (pictured) said the new measures would be introduced as motorcyclists are among the most vulnerable road users.

Road Safety Minister Jesse Norman (pictured) said the new measures would be introduced as motorcyclists are among the most vulnerable road users.

The DVSA has partnered with the Department of Transport (DfT) to assess the opinions of 2,200 respondents on nine proposed changes to improve road safety for new riders.

About 85% of those surveyed agreed that new drivers should take a knowledge test before taking a CBT course, while the same percentage said they wanted CBT certificates revoked by provisional license holders for reckless or dangerous driving offenses.

People were also broadly in favor of introducing training courses for existing motorcyclists, limiting drivers to only riding automatic scooters if they completed their CBT on one or more protective clothing and riding skills training. as part of basic training.

There was also overwhelming support for more DVSA checks on motorcycle training schools and instructor qualifications.

The DVSA has confirmed that some of the proposals will require further consultation in spring 2018 before a decision is made on their implementation.

Driving Instructors Association (DIA) chief examiner Mark Jaffe welcomed the new idea and said the DIA had been pushing for improved rider training standards “for a number of years”.

Making these training improvements will help ensure that motorcyclists have the skills and knowledge they need to help them stay safe on our modern and busy roads.

Mark Winn, Head of Cycling and Professional Policy at the DVSA

“The results of the consultation show support for the changes that we believe are long overdue,” he said.

“The changes will increase the importance of riders receiving the correct training for the machines they are riding and reduce the number of casualties through better and more targeted training.”

Others also welcomed the proposals, but stressed that mopeds and scooters should always be accessible to new drivers as they are an affordable mode of transportation for many.

Karen Cole, Motorcycle Industry Association (MCIA) Director of Safety and Training, said, “We welcome the publication of responses to the consultation on Modernizing Motorcycle Education and look forward to working with the Motorcycle Industry Association. DVSA to significantly improve the safety of bikers in the future.

“It is important, however, that motorized two-wheelers remain accessible, as they are the only affordable form of transportation for many people and an increasingly important part of our transportation mix as commuters seek solutions to creeping traffic jams. . “

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VIDEO: Southampton scooter group steps up fight against cancer


THEY ditched their leather jackets and parkers and chose tutus in the fight against cancer.

A group of Southampton scooter enthusiasts have grown stronger and are encouraging the people of Hampshire to follow their example and help raise funds for Stand Up To Cancer.

Angie Ayres and her Mod friends – locally nicknamed the Southampton Meerkats, know all too well the devastation cancer can cause.

Two years ago, Vespa‘s rider Angie, 54, learned she had breast cancer.

At the time, she had just lost her beloved father George to the same illness and had returned from Cardiff to Southampton to care for her mother.

Angie underwent two cycles of surgery, the first to remove a lump, and then a second operation after surgeons found more cancer cells and removed her lymph nodes.

Angie said: “From the day I was diagnosed until theater it was all so fast, I didn’t have time to process it – I just got down to it.

“My first thought was ‘what’s the plan of action?’

“Some people go to the depths of despair but because of my father I got angry. I decided that cancer was not going to catch me.

Angie, who now works for Mencap in Portswood, says she was supported by her partner Phil, 52, whom she met at a scooter rally when she returned to Southampton.

In May 2015, Angie started chemotherapy and seven months later had her last radiation therapy session on Christmas Eve.

She said, “My whole life has changed because of cancer. That’s why my friends and I are showing our support for Stand Up To Cancer and don the crazy orange wigs and tutus.

“It’s a fun and easy way to get involved and help raise funds to save more lives. ”

Stand Up To Cancer is a joint Cancer Research UK and Channel 4 fundraising campaign aimed at delivering pioneering new tests and treatments to cancer patients faster.

Jenny Makin, Cancer Research UK spokesperson for Hampshire, said: “We would like to thank Angie and the Southampton Meerkats for their colorful support and getting into the spirit of Stand Up To Cancer.

“We are asking men, women and children across the county to wear orange, pay and eliminate cancer.

“By supporting, they will help raise funds and transform the lives of cancer patients and their families. ”

Since launching in the UK five years ago, Stand Up To Cancer has raised over £ 38million for more than 40 clinical trials and research projects.


Scooter Riders Rally at Back to the Basics Skegness Scooter Rally 2017


Scooter drivers gathered in force for the Skegness scooter rally 2017. Like other scooter rallies in the UK and USA, Skegness is all about the people, tent and van camping, music and loads and loads of scooters.

Skegness is a seaside town on the English North Sea coast of Lincolnshire, with a population of less than 20,000. When scooters descend on Skegness, well before the summer season in England, two-wheelers and their riders stand out.

A wide variety of scooters showed up at Skegness. Some were fairly new models with little to no visible modifications.

Some people adorn their scooters with mirrors and lights. Putting extra lights on your ride can certainly help oncoming traffic see the relatively small scooters, but extra mirrors are a unique adornment without any apparent practical benefit.

While still others convert their little rides into chopper.

Camping is a big part of scooter rallies in the UK. From photos of the event, it appears motorhomes and vans line up around the perimeter of the campsite while the majority of attendees stay in tents. At least one rider has prioritized their bike for tent space, clearly demonstrating their priorities.

If you missed Skegness, it’s not too late for more scooter rally fun in 2017. The same group that runs the Skegness Scooter Rally is running the Boston “Run to the Stump” rally August 4-5, 2017 However, this is Boston. , Lincolnshire in the UK, not Massachusetts. Details will be available on the Skegness scooter rally Facebook page.

The biggest American scooter event this year will be AmeriVespa, held in Seattle, Washington from July 5-9, sponsored by the Vespa Club of America. You do not need to drive a Vespa to participate in AmeriVespa, all scooter owners are welcome. And if you want to witness all the noise, you don’t even have to own a scooter – you can rent one at In regards to in Seattle.







Two bad wheels? Genoa scooters fight ban in Vespa’s hometown | Italy


Scooter owners in Genoa, home of the Vespa, are celebrating a partial victory after the city’s mayor postponed a ban on models produced before 1999 intended to tackle pollution.

The hashtag #handsoffmyvespa has gone viral on social media, with furious bikers in the northwestern coastal city – which has more motorcycles per capita than anywhere else in Italy – repeating the slogan: “Born in Genoa, died in Genoa “.

In December, Mayor Marco Doria signed an anti-smog initiative due to go into effect in February, which is said to have blocked nearly 20,000 two-wheeler drivers.

But the measure banning their use in large areas of the city center between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. sparked such a backlash that it was suspended until April to give people time to organize alternative transportation – and could still be. abandoned.

“This really shouldn’t be happening,” Vittorio Vernazzano of Vespa Club Genova told Corriere della Sera. “Especially not in 2016, the 70th anniversary of the birth of the Vespa, and in Genoa, where it was produced in 1946 by a Genoese entrepreneur, Enrico Piaggio.

The city has fewer cars than any other in Italy, with the exception of Venice, where the main mode of transportation is by boat or gondola, and pro-Vespa activists say Genoa’s public transport services are poor.

But Italo Porcile, an environmental expert, is determined not to give in to the pressure. “I love the Vespino, I had one myself,” he said. “But Euro 0 [a model produced before 1999] pollutes terribly and public health is more important.

Piaggio, which started producing locomotives and then fighter jets, invented the Vespa after WWII when the country’s roads, badly damaged by bombing, needed an alternative to cars for the masses.

With its distinctive stamped steel frame, the Vespa was made famous outside Italy by the 1953 film Roman Holiday, starring Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck.


Scooter riders warming up for next weekend’s Redcar Scooter rally


Redcar will resonate with the sound of two-stroke engines when it welcomes scooter enthusiasts from across the country next weekend.

The annual Redcar Scooter rally will be held again on June 5-6, having been resuscitated in 2014 after a hiatus of more than 20 years.

Scooter drivers gathered at the Stray Cafe in Redcar yesterday for a warm-up before the big event begins in earnest.

Damian Hunt, 45, who is hosting next weekend’s event alongside his friend Paul Power, said: “Last year has been brilliant. Over 1000 people came with their scooters and it was a great success.

“Obviously we want to get bigger and better every year, so we want more people to join us this year.

“I think it’s a good thing for Redcar. We have sold tickets to people all over England, I think the furthest away so far is Northampton.

“This means, hopefully, good business for businesses – pubs, cafes, bed and breakfasts – in Redcar.

“I remember the scooter rallies we had at Redcar in the 1980s. It got me into it when I was a kid. I liked the style, I liked the music and the lifestyle.

Dozens of scooter riders gathered for a preview of the rally yesterday, including 19-year-old Charlie Leech.

The Redcar teenager brought his Vespa scooter, which he spent £ 1,300 to modify.

He said: “I can’t wait to be at the rally. When I was in school, I got into music and then clothes and I said to myself: I need to get a scooter.

Music over the two-day festival, which will be held at the Redcar Rugby Club, will come from Clashed, The Extra Specials, Ordinary Affairs, Slow Moving Targets, The Revolve and Acoustic Weller.

Tickets are available for Friday and Saturday events, and for the whole weekend plus camping, on the redcarscooterrally.co.uk website or Facebook at Redcar Scooter Rally 2015.


Biker tribute to John Norman Martin


A HUGE scooter procession is expected to pass through Bishopthorpe today for the funeral of a York scooter enthusiast known to his friends as “Vespa John”.

The death of John Norman Martin, 53, was greeted by family and friends with shock but also with warm memories of a “quite decent guy”.

He died suddenly in his sleep at his home in Bishopthorpe on March 30.

His girlfriend, Hayley Owen, 21, said the last time she and John were together was on a scooter from Knaresborough to York, just days before she died.

She said: “I met John through the Inset Scooter Club – we did it all together. She was a soul mate.

“It’s a big shock for everyone. The Sunday before his death the sun was shining and we looked forward to summer. Everyone was saying how good John looked.

John Martin was born at Campleshon Road in York and was a student at Tadcaster Grammar School. He was an early member of the York Scooter Club when it was founded in the 1970s, and when he wasn’t playing scooters, John loved flash cars as well.

His sister, Dawn Pawson, said: “He once had a Starsky and Hutch car – red, with a white stripe. He also had an MG, but he always came back to scooters.

“The scooter guys were always around our house. My father was never able to drive his car.

For the past seven years John had been a member of the Inset Scooter Cub where he was a familiar site on his Vespa, called “CHIPS”, which was decorated in the colors of an American police motorcycle.

Fellow and friend Nick Beilby said: “He loved being a part of the scooter scene.

“Whenever we went for a scooter run and one of us broke down, as we invariably did, he always helped.

“I know it’s a cliché, but he didn’t have a bad say in anyone. He was a really nice guy and he will be missed.

Alan May, founder of York Inset, said: “He was a popular member of the club and could always be relied on to show up at gatherings. He was a good guy in every way.

Bikers and scooter riders are expected to gather this morning at 10 a.m. to pass St Andrew’s Church for Mr Martin’s funeral at 10:30 a.m.


Frampton’s mother’s safety appeal to scooter drivers


A MOTHER who lost her daughter in a scooter accident 10 years ago has issued a safety warning to all road users on two wheels.

Cathy Loving’s daughter, Jo, was 17 when she was killed in an accident on the A37 at Wrackleford, north of Dorchester.

Cathy, from Frampton, was deeply shaken by the tragedy but did her best to get something positive out of it and every year she hosts a fun day to raise funds to help promote road safety in memory of Jo.

She said: “It’s about making people on two wheels aware that people on two wheels are vulnerable and making them think. It’s not just motorcyclists and scooters, but cyclists as well.

Cathy says the fateful night of July 20, 1999, when she lost her daughter, appears to be “only yesterday”.

She said: “She was coming home around half past nine or ten in her Vespa on the A37 when a car hit her head on.

“He just didn’t see her and she died at the scene.”

She added: “It’s like it’s still yesterday, but when you think about it, 10 years is a lifetime. Now that the 10 years have passed, I think about what it would have been like now.

Cathy said her campaign, which grew out of these tragic events, was not aimed at scaring people away from scooters, motorcycles and bicycles. This is to raise awareness of the use and enjoyment of safe two-wheeled transport.

She said: “Jo was born around scooters and has been around them her whole life.

“When I gave her younger sister Charlotte her first scooter, someone said I must be mad at what happened.

“But I didn’t want to take away his independence, I couldn’t do that.

“We just want to educate people as much as possible about the dangers of the road.

“I just hope people embrace it and ride sensibly, and they realize that there are people on the road who don’t care about other road users.”


Safety course for scooter riders


Gasoline prices fuel scooter sales, but much of the appeal of scooters is their non-threatening profile and ease of use. You don’t swing one leg on a scooter like you would on a motorcycle. You just take the plunge and sit down. You also don’t need to master a manual transmission. You just turn the handle and go.

Yet scooters are prone to many of the same safety concerns as motorcycles. Their size makes them difficult for drivers to see, and on smaller displacement models in particular, their low horsepower makes mixing with fast traffic more difficult.

If you want to ride a scooter and aren’t already a regular two-wheeler, the Motorcycle Safety Foundation has a few recommendations.

First, start riding a bike – “just to get used to balancing on two wheels and using the hand controls,” said Ray Ochs, MSF’s director of training systems. “Make sure you’ve integrated motor skills. It is very, very important.

Once you have mastered these skills, you would do well to enroll in a safety course. MSF is the organization that provides most of the motorcycle safety training programs in the 50 states. Two of these courses apply to scooters. His Scooter School is a beginner’s class that teaches riders street strategies as well as how to use the controls on scooters 200cc and smaller. The four hour course offers riders a series of 10 exercises, but it does not end with a skill test; they will still have to pass the driving test required by the California Department of Motor Vehicles to obtain the M1 license to operate a motor vehicle, without pedals, of 49 cc or more. Scooter school is not currently available in California, so a better option is the Basic RiderCourse administered by the California Motorcyclist Safety Program. The 15 hour course is the same safety course recommended for novice motorcyclists. It includes five hours of classroom instruction to familiarize drivers with the safety concerns of operating a two-wheeled motor vehicle on the street and 10 hours of driving that teaches proper starting, stopping, braking and cornering. The class ends with a skill test which, if successful, overrides the driving test at the DMV; the written test remains compulsory for the M1 license.

Most sites use 250 cc motorcycles, but scooters are welcome. Beginner cyclists can bring their own or borrow one from a site that already has a scooter in its regular fleet. Sites in the LA area that have scooters available for loan are: West LA, the San Fernando Valley, and Long Beach.

I recommend taking the course before buying a scooter, just to make sure the scooter is right for you. This way, you can find the answer in a safe environment without spending or risking anything other than the cost of the course, which is $ 150 to $ 235.

For more information on the nearest BRC and class availability, call (877) 743-3411 or visit www.ca-msp.org.