World Record Scooter Team Comes Home For Lansdale Mardi Gras Parade | New


LANSDALE >> If you’re coming to the 69th Annual Lansdale Mardi Gras Parade this Saturday, keep your eyes peeled to see two men wearing bright blue sweatshirts with the words ‘World Record’ on the front and riding motorized scooters on the parade route. They will celebrate their return to the borough almost three months after embarking on an adventure across the country of more than 9,000 miles that will earn them a place in the Guinness Book of Records.

At 7:45 p.m. Tuesday night, Yonatan Belik, 30, of Israel, and Michael Reid, 32, of south Philadelphia, officially completed their attempt to break the world record for the longest ride on a 50cc scooter by pulling their Honda. Ruckus scooters in the parking lot of the town hall. They were greeted in town by Mayor Garry Herbert and Police Chief Michael Trail, who officially witnessed the end of the duo’s round trip across America known as “Project Create.” 48 ”. Their effort shattered the previous record of 8,968 miles.

The decision to ride scooters, given their top speed of around 35 mph, was intentional, according to the team‘s website. “We recognize how our busy lives cause us to focus on the destination rather than the journey, so we choose to take it slow. Invest time to immerse ourselves in our surroundings and avoid any chance of getting a speeding ticket while driving at 30 mph.

The two set a similar record for the longest distance scooted in 24 hours last summer. Both were produced under the direction of “Wheeling for the World”, a global association of members who seek to collaborate across cultures and countries.

‘Chlichout’

The duo were delighted to be back in Lansdale and said the unique experience was both uplifting and inspiring. The purpose of the trip was to bond community by meeting new people and learning their stories. For Reid, the trip helped him learn to trust the kindness of complete strangers.

“I grew up in a tough neighborhood and often have a strong distrust of strangers,” he said. “People I don’t know don’t have my best interests in mind. This is what I firmly believed before that.

He told the story of driving one evening in the freezing cold of New Mexico and at risk of developing hypothermia from the exposure. “Belik had the idea of ​​knocking on a stranger’s door in the New Mexico countryside. Being from the United States, I knew you don’t do this. You get shot doing that, ”Reid said. Belik did it anyway and graciously the owner invited them inside. “It was a great time… when it came to actually, they were very friendly.”

The trip challenged Reid’s preconceptions about compassion for strangers and helped him learn to befriend every new person he meets.

Belik, meanwhile, has learned to overcome the physical demands of travel. “One thing that comes to my mind is how difficult it was,” he said. “We’re talking six to 10 hours a day sitting on our butt… on unfamiliar terrain, in weather conditions I’ve never experienced in my life. I grew up in Israel. it’s hot. Here it is not only snowing, it is actually freezing. Your fingers are numb.

The trip was also an opportunity for Belik and Reid to inspire others. Along the way, they documented their travels online through photos and videos and by interviewing more than 200 people they met in each state. They hoped to share America’s untold stories. Belik called the journey a “shlichut,” which is a Hebrew word meaning a mission or an inner call. Everywhere they went, they met new people and learned their personal stories. He hoped that their attempt to break the world record would inspire people to pursue their own personal dreams, no matter how far-fetched they were. “Everyone has dreams and everyone has aspirations,” he said. “And some people don’t necessarily believe they can reach them… We were on a mission and everyone has a mission.”

Happy to see you again

The trip began on September 7, when the duo set off during Lansdale Bike Night, sponsored by the Blue Comet Motorcycle Club in Skippack. Gene Reynolds, president of Lansdale Bike Night, said the two travelers contacted him to start their trip at the family event and it looked perfect.

“We escorted them out of town with one of our members who took a picture of them leaving town and we were able to follow them online to find out where they were,” he said. he declares. “They contacted me several times. They contacted me once and they were in the snow in New Mexico. They’re two crazy guys… it’s been a great experience.

“It’s a good thing for our club because we are so diverse,” said Russell Smith, president of the Blue Comet Motorcycle Club. “Most motorcycle clubs have a bad reputation and we do a lot of charitable work, veteran work. We are a family biker club. We’ve been around forever and we have a lot of respect there.

State Representative Steve Malagari, D-53rd Dist., Who helped evict Reid and Belik in September but was unable to make it to their meeting on Tuesday, praised their accomplishment. “Their goal of connecting communities and cultures through conversation is a cause that speaks volumes and is at the heart of what our district is also striving to do,” he said. “A better understanding of our communities and our world through dialogue is something we should all aspire to have. I’m proud that this world record started and ended in Lansdale, PA and the 53rd District.

Meanwhile, Herbert was delighted to welcome the two travelers to town on Tuesday evening, having been there to see them leave almost three months previously. “I am extremely proud that Lansdale is featured in the Guinness Book of Records. It’s a monumental occasion, ”said Herbert, who embraced Belik and Reid on their return. “It’s not everyday that you welcome the start and end of a trip like this. This is a testament to the quality of the Lansdale community.

Herbert said he was proud of Reid and Belik’s accomplishment, as well as their message about slowing down and enjoying the world around you. “It’s really positive,” Herbert said. “We are constantly changing and moving forward. There is value in slowing down and enjoying the world around you. It resonates with the residents of Lansdale because of who we are and everything that is happening in our community. “

Good road

With their accomplishment now headed to the record books, Reid and Belik said they are already making plans for their next adventure. The two travel to Iceland to break the world record for the longest distance in an electric unicycle while juggling three balls.

“I know that sounds absurd, and it’s a little absurd,” Belik said. “What we’re trying to do here is use the notoriety of Guinness World Records to draw attention to important things. The guy we’re going to do this with, he’s got a disease similar to (multiple sclerosis). He’s an amazing performer and juggler, but he knows he’s going to lose his ability to perform and be physically active in the years to come. We want to draw attention to this. Not just for people in his place to push each other, but for people like us who have skills that don’t necessarily push themselves to these extremes.

After Iceland, the pair will travel to Israel in June to begin a 600-mile journey on electric unicycles from the country’s northern tip to the southern tip and back again. The aim will be to amplify the stories of the people of the country and to humanize them for the world to see. “We want to close these gaps which are getting wider and wider,” Belik said.

To learn more about Reid and Belik’s record-breaking adventure, visit https://projectcreate48.wheelingfortheworld.org/

The 69th Annual Lansdale Mardi Gras Parade begins Saturday, November 23 at 1 p.m. The rain or shine event features community organizations, local groups and ends with a visit from Santa. The parade stretches from Main and Mitchell Streets to Main and Park Street. For more information visit http://lansdale.org/400/Mardi-Gras-Parade

Editor-in-chief Dan Sokil contributed to this report.


World record scooter team heads home for Lansdale Mardi Gras parade – thereporteronline


LANSDALE >> If you come to the 69th Annual Lansdale Mardi Gras Parade this Saturday, keep your eyes peeled to see two men wearing bright blue sweatshirts with the words ‘World Record’ on the front and riding motorized scooters down the course of the parade. They will celebrate their return to the borough almost three months after embarking on an adventure across the country of more than 9,000 miles that will earn them a place in the Guinness Book of Records.

At 7:45 p.m. Tuesday night, Yonatan Belik, 30, of Israel, and Michael Reid, 32, of south Philadelphia, officially completed their attempt to break the world record for the longest ride on a 50cc scooter by pulling their Honda. Ruckus scooters in the parking lot of the town hall. They were greeted in town by Mayor Garry Herbert and Police Chief Michael Trail, who officially witnessed the end of the duo’s round trip across America known as “Project Create.” 48 ”. Their effort shattered the previous record of 8,968 miles.

The decision to ride scooters, given their top speed of around 35 mph, was intentional, according to the team‘s website. “We recognize how our busy lives cause us to focus on the destination rather than the journey, so we choose to take it slow. Invest time to immerse ourselves in our surroundings and avoid any chance of getting a speeding ticket while driving at 30 mph.

The two set a similar record for the longest distance scooted in 24 hours last summer. Both were produced under the direction of “Wheeling for the World”, a global association of members who seek to collaborate across cultures and countries.

‘Chlichout’

The duo were delighted to be back in Lansdale and said the unique experience was both uplifting and inspiring. The purpose of the trip was to bond community by meeting new people and learning their stories. For Reid, the trip helped him learn to trust the kindness of complete strangers.

“I grew up in a tough neighborhood and often have a strong distrust of strangers,” he said. “People I don’t know don’t have my best interests in mind. This is what I firmly believed before that.

He told the story of driving one evening in the freezing cold of New Mexico and at risk of developing hypothermia from the exposure. “Belik had the idea of ​​knocking on a stranger’s door in the New Mexico countryside. Being from the United States, I knew you don’t do this. You get shot doing that, ”Reid said. Belik did it anyway and graciously the owner invited them inside. “It was a great time… when it came to actually, they were very friendly.”

The trip challenged Reid’s preconceptions about compassion for strangers and helped him learn to befriend every new person he meets.

Belik, meanwhile, has learned to overcome the physical demands of travel. “One thing that comes to my mind is how difficult it was,” he said. “We talk six to ten hours a day sitting on our buttocks… on unfamiliar terrain, in weather conditions I’ve never experienced in my life. I grew up in Israel. it’s hot. Here it is not only snowing, it is actually freezing. Your fingers are numb.

The trip was also an opportunity for Belik and Reid to inspire others. Along the way, they documented their travels online through photos and videos and by interviewing more than 200 people they met in each state. They hoped to share America’s untold stories. Belik called the journey a “shlichut,” which is a Hebrew word meaning a mission or an inner call. Everywhere they went, they met new people and learned their personal stories. He hoped that their attempt to break the world record would inspire people to pursue their own personal dreams, no matter how far-fetched they were. “Everyone has dreams and everyone has aspirations,” he said. “And some people don’t necessarily believe they can reach them… We were on a mission and everyone has a mission.”

Happy to see you again

The trip began on September 7, when the duo set off during Lansdale Bike Night, sponsored by the Blue Comet Motorcycle Club in Skippack. Gene Reynolds, president of Lansdale Bike Night, said the two travelers contacted him to start their trip at the family event and it looked perfect.

“We escorted them out of town with one of our members who took a picture of them leaving town and we were able to follow them online to find out where they were,” he said. he declares. “They contacted me several times. They contacted me once and they were in the snow in New Mexico. They’re two crazy guys… it’s been a great experience.

“It’s a good thing for our club because we are so diverse,” said Russell Smith, president of the Blue Comet Motorcycle Club. “Most motorcycle clubs have a bad reputation and we do a lot of charitable work, veteran work. We are a family biker club. We’ve been around forever and we have a lot of respect there.

State Representative Steve Malagari, D-53rd Dist., Who helped evict Reid and Belik in September but was unable to make it to their meeting on Tuesday, praised their accomplishment. “Their goal of connecting communities and cultures through conversation is a cause that speaks volumes and is also at the heart of what our district strives to achieve,” he said. “A better understanding of our communities and our world through dialogue is something we should all aspire to have. I’m proud that this world record started and ended in Lansdale, PA and the 53rd District.

Meanwhile, Herbert was delighted to welcome the two travelers to town on Tuesday evening, having been there to see them leave almost three months previously. “I am extremely proud that Lansdale is featured in the Guinness Book of Records. It’s a monumental occasion, ”said Herbert, who embraced Belik and Reid on their return. “It’s not everyday that you welcome the start and end of a trip like this. This is a testament to the quality of the Lansdale community.

Herbert said he was proud of Reid and Belik’s accomplishment, as well as their message about slowing down and enjoying the world around you. “It’s really positive,” Herbert said. “We are constantly changing and moving forward. There is value in slowing down and enjoying the world around you. It resonates with the residents of Lansdale because of who we are and everything that is happening in our community.

Good road

With their accomplishment now headed to the record books, Reid and Belik said they are already making plans for their next adventure. The two travel to Iceland to break the world record for the longest distance in an electric unicycle while juggling three balls.

“I know that sounds absurd, and it’s a little absurd,” Belik said. “What we’re trying to do here is use the notoriety of Guinness World Records to draw attention to important things. The guy we’re going to do this with, he’s got a disease similar to (multiple sclerosis). He’s an amazing performer and juggler, but he knows he’s going to lose his ability to perform and be physically active in the years to come. We want to draw attention to this. Not just for people in his place to push each other, but for people like us who have skills that don’t necessarily push themselves to these extremes.

After Iceland, the pair will travel to Israel in June to begin a 600-mile journey on electric unicycles from the country’s northern tip to the southern tip and back. The aim will be to amplify the stories of the people of the country and to humanize them for the world to see. “We want to close these growing gaps,” Belik said.

To learn more about Reid and Belik’s record-breaking adventure, visit https://projectcreate48.wheelingfortheworld.org/

The 69th Annual Lansdale Mardi Gras Parade begins Saturday, November 23 at 1 p.m. The rain or shine event features community organizations, local groups and ends with a visit from Santa. The parade stretches from Main and Mitchell Streets to Main and Park Street. For more information visit http://lansdale.org/400/Mardi-Gras-Parade

Editor-in-chief Dan Sokil contributed to this report.


Committee approves changes to dockless scooter and bicycle law

SAN DIEGO (CNS) – The San Diego City Council’s Active Transportation and Infrastructure Committee voted unanimously Wednesday to send a set of proposed additions to the city’s regulations on scooters and dockless bicycles to the plenary council for further consideration.

The committee approved a handful of amendments to the ordinance at the request of the mayor’s office. Suggested changes include a midnight to 5 a.m. curfew, use of a device by government ID, fine-grained structure and punitive actions for businesses that violate city bylaws, and eliminating the provision of the original ordinance allowing for temporary fleet spikes during large events like Comic Con.

The amendments would also authorize the city to take actions such as reducing the size of a company‘s fleet if it poses a danger to public safety or outright suspending a company for multiple violations and requiring the potential use of geofencing technology to prevent users from crossing city sidewalks.

RELATED: San Diego Scooter Ridership Drops Dramatically

The council approved the initial regulatory package in April after more than a year of complaints from residents about the need for oversight. The city has sought to improve public safety while keeping dockless mobility companies in the area as an affordable transportation alternative.

The regulatory order included limiting the speed of scooters and parking in high traffic areas of the city, operator permits and fees for scooter companies like Bird and Lime, documentation of the size of the scooter fleet and data sharing requirements between scooter companies and the city.

The city also introduced a webpage, sandiego.gov/bicycling/bicycle-and-scooter-sharing, giving residents the ability to see which businesses operate in San Diego and contact information for each. The regulation came into effect in July.

RELATED: San Diego City Council leader calls for temporary ban on dockless scooters

Representatives from the scooter companies Bird, Lyft and Lime noted that ridership has declined since the regulations took effect and that new issues have arisen, such as third-party scooter seizure companies charging high prices. companies to collect their scooters and bicycles.

Bird’s senior manager of government partnerships, Tim Harder, said the company spends $5,000 a week collecting scooters only from city-designated pounds.

“As the second market where Bird launched in 2018, San Diego has always been important to our business,” he said. “We want to stay in San Diego, especially with the new technologies that we are eager to test here that promote public safety and education.”

RELATED: San Diego Creates Designated Spaces for Dockless Scooters and Bikes

A scooter company, Jump, exited the San Diego market earlier this year due to its belief that the city could not effectively enforce its regulations and encourage good behavior among cyclists.

Representatives from several companies, including Jump, and Councilman Chris Cate have suggested implementing a dynamic fleet cap that would limit companies that repeatedly violate the city’s ordinance.

“In other cities, such as Santa Monica, that use this type of performance-based system, operators strive to go above and beyond to demonstrate to city officials that they have earned the right to deploy more devices,” Jump San Diego senior operations manager Zach Williams said.

City officials are expected to review the legality of the amendment package before it is presented to the full council. With just four meetings remaining before the council takes its legislative winter recess, the council could wait to consider the ordinance until early next year.

UC San Diego considers rule changes for use of scooters and bikes on campus – NBC 7 San Diego


UC San Diego is considering tightening its regulations on so-called “micromobility devices” like bicycles, skateboards and scooters, although the school is not going so far as to ban them altogether.

The UCSD Police Department announced the proposed changes earlier this month, which include changes to how they can be used on campus.

Under the new regulations, operators “cannot carry passengers or objects that interfere with their balance, their ability to travel at a safe speed, or to steer or stop the vehicle in a safe and efficient manner.”

The proposed policy states that passengers would be prohibited from using cell phones or other portable electronic devices. The policy also sets out new rules regarding the use of headphones or earphones when using a micromobility device.

According to these rules, operators “may not wear headphones, earplugs or headphones that cover, rest on, or fit into both ears when using the device.”

San Diego State University has banned the use of micromobility devices on campus starting this fall by creating geolocated no-traffic zones. The school created designated parking areas on the outskirts of campus for students to connect their devices.

Sophomore Sean Castillo often drives a scooter around campus. He said the proposed changes made sense.

“It seems pretty logical not to have both ears covered, that way you can hear people, traffic, making sure people are safe,” Castillo said.

Sophomore Raymond Lau agreed. He said he saw a number of close calls while skateboarding at UCSD.

“I think it’s important to consider the safety of others because it’s pretty reckless if someone just gets hit by a skateboard or a bicycle.”

Students are encouraged to weigh in on the proposed changes until November 30, and questions and comments can be sent to Paula Johnson in Policy and Records Administration at [email protected]


GOP Legislator Bill Would Cap Securities Lending Interest Rates at 36% | Local News

PHOENIX — A Mesa GOP lawmaker is proposing what he concedes is a very un-Republican thing. Senator David Farnsworth has introduced two bills to cap the interest rate that can be charged by securities lenders at 36%. This compares to rates of up to 17% – per month.

Farnsworth also wants to close what he says is a loophole in the law that allows people to borrow without actually having a title to their vehicle, a practice he says is reminiscent of the now-banned practice of payday loans.

“There’s a limit to everything,” Farnsworth said of his desire to crack down on title lending, money borrowed with the vehicle’s title used as collateral. “The question is, are they honest?”

He said the current law provides for a tiered interest structure for title loans, with lenders allowed to charge 17% per month on loans of $500 or less. This rate decreases as the money borrowed increases, with interest allowed at 10% per month on loans over $5,000.

But Farnsworth said it really doesn’t paint a true picture for borrowers.

People also read…

“The (annual) rate can be over 300%,” he said.

SB 1005 would amend the Securities Lending Act to state an annual rate, rather than a monthly rate, and place the cap at 36%. And an even more aggressive proposal in SB 1004 would apply the 36% cap to the first $3,000 borrowed, with anything over that cap roughly capped at 24% per year.

Farnsworth said this is not the first time he has found himself at odds with his party, at least on this issue.

For example, he cited a proposal several years ago by Senator JD Mesnard, R-Chandler, to allow something called “flexible loans.”

On paper, these would have carried an interest cap of 36%. But the key would be how lenders calculate “usual fees” for everything from managing account information, validating customer information, processing transactions and providing periodic billing statements.

These fees are now capped at $150.

Mesnard’s legislation, however, would have allowed that fee to total half a percentage point of the outstanding balance. On a maximum authorized loan of $3,000, that could add up to $15 a day in fees — on top of the 36% interest — raising the effective interest rate to triple digits.

Farnsworth said he and the then senator. Kimberly Yee, R-Phoenix, who is now state treasurer, worked with Democrats to overturn the plan.

“I know a lot of Republicans feel like ‘free market, free market, it’s fine as long as it’s the free market,'” he said. But Farnsworth said it wasn’t so. simple.

“I say we have to be responsible and consider the effects of what we do,” he said.

“A lot of people are hurt,” Farnsworth continued. “I think we have to be responsible for everything that happens in our state as much as possible.”

Farnsworth said he thinks his view on interest caps aligns with the sentiments of most Arizonans.

He pointed to the 2008 election when voters decided to scrap payday loans as lenders spent more than $17 million campaigning to keep them legal.

These short-term loans allowed people to borrow up to $500 for two-week periods, at interest rates of over 400% per year.

But Farnsworth said it was clear the lenders had not given up.

“Now they’re coming back and calling them ‘registration loans,’ he said, high-interest loans made by title lending companies – but to people who aren’t actually owners. of their vehicles. He said it was effectively the same as a payday loan.

“They found a loophole.”

It is this “loophole” that Farnsworth said his SB 1003 would close by requiring “clear title to the motor vehicle the borrower is using to secure the loan”.

There was no immediate response from the securities lending industry.

But a move with similar language imposing a 36% annual interest cap has drawn opposition from Stuart Goodman, who lobbies for the Arizona Title Loan Association.

“Our customers are people who can’t get those rates,” he said, saying they were “high-risk people with bad credit” who need immediate, short-term cash. term.

This ballot measure would effectively ban title loans by capping the interest rates that lenders can charge at a maximum of 36%. Backers need 237,645 valid signatures by July 2 to put the question on the 2020 ballot.

But there could be another measure on the ballot next year that trumps both.

The National Credit Alliance is gathering signatures on a proposal that would give banks, finance companies and other lenders the freedom to charge their Arizona customers whatever interest rates they want.

This is intended as a constitutional amendment, which means that if approved, it will supersede all state laws, whether enacted by the Legislative Assembly or the voters.

Sean Noble, the proposal’s campaign manager, said the amount of interest lenders should be able to charge should be “a market decision”.

“If you can find someone to offer you a lower interest rate than someone else, then it should be a competitive market,” he said.

2020 Vespa scooter models unveiled


Live the city life? You probably have your eye on a Vespa scooter, and the Italian brand has unveiled some eye-catching new models at the 2019 International Motorcycle Show.

The company is plugging into the electric mobility movement, presenting a new model Vespa Elettrica 70 km / h which, as the name suggests, pushes the performance of the existing electric Vespa to a new level.

Vespa Elettrica 70km / h uses a lithium-ion battery and an electric motor.”/> The Vespa Elettrica 70km / h uses a lithium-ion battery and an electric motor.

According to Vespa, the Elettrica 70 km / h uses a lithium-ion battery and an electric motor, and has a range of up to 100 km. It’s in Eco mode, which limits the bike to 45km / h (the same level as the previous Elettrica). In Power mode, you can reach 70 km / h and the range is estimated at 70 km.

Other models on display include the Sean Wotherspoon – if you don’t recognize that name, google it – he’s a well-known designer. And the Vespa Primavera Sean Wotherspoon is clearly influenced by his work, with “a contemporary vintage touch in what is his hallmark.” You can even pick up a matching helmet, t-shirts or a “modern tracksuit”.

The Vespa Primavera Sean Wotherspoon can be worn with a matching helmet, t-shirts or a “modern tracksuit”. The Vespa Primavera Sean Wotherspoon can be worn with a matching helmet, t-shirts or a “modern tracksuit”.

The special edition Vespa Primavera 125 (RED) is perhaps quieter, you guessed it, the Rosso paint. It has contrasting trim elements to help it stand out and even bears a red Vespa logo.

If retro is your favorite look, the Vespa Racing Sixties series will suit your bill. According to the brand, “the inspiration comes from the gentleman’s races of the 60s”, with contrasting graphics in yellow and green or red and white, it is available as a Vespa Sprint (50cc, 125cc and 150cc engines) or Vespa GTS Super ( 125cc or 300cc engines) spec.

  • The special edition Vespa Primavera 125 (RED) receives Rosso paint and contrasting trim elements. The special edition Vespa Primavera 125 (RED) receives Rosso paint and contrasting trim elements.
  • The Vespa Racing Sixties series is inspired by the "60s gentleman rider races ”. The Vespa Racing Sixties series is inspired by the “gentleman rider races of the 60s”.

Styling highlights include gold wheels and a “soft, velvety nubuck” seat with handcrafted stitching and a weatherproof PVC coating.

Expect some of these 2020 Vespa models to be offered in Australia in the coming months.


City seeks scooter and bicycle rental company again after pilot program fails | criminality


Shared mobility programs have sprung up in Austin, Fort Worth, Dallas, Denton and other major cities across the state, occasionally encountering problems and becoming a public nuisance when poorly implemented. Waco passed an ordinance to allow shared mobility programs within the city earlier this year.

In August 2018, scooter company Bird Rides scattered its scooters around downtown and the Baylor campus without giving a warning or asking for permission. The city withdrew the scooters after a two-day race.

Although there are some differences between the two tenders, the professional requirements of the applicant companies will remain the same. The program will be limited to downtown Waco and East Waco, but the service area will exclude Baylor University and Cameron Park.

“We need to be a little less prescriptive in what we ask,” Chelsea Phlegar, senior planner at the Waco Metropolitan Planning Organization. “This will allow us to be more responsive to constant changes in the market. “

Gotcha had planned to build parking centers throughout the service area. The new proposal still requires some form of controlled parking, but allows for different types of parking and supports.

“What that actually looks like, we leave it up to the company to present to us,” said Phlegar.